PRIMORIS      Contacts      FAQs      INSTICC Portal
 

Keynote Lectures

Photogrammetry meets BIM
Uwe Stilla, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Germany

Positioning techniques and accuracy requirements in Geo-sciences and Engineering
Kostas E. Katsambalos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Available Soon
Eugene Fiume, University of Toronto, Canada

 

Photogrammetry meets BIM

Uwe Stilla
Technische Universitaet Muenchen
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Prof. Stilla is the Head of the Department of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing and cource direktor of the Bachelor’s and Master’s Programs “Geodesy and Geoinformation" at Technical University of Munich. His research interests include analysis of images and point clouds in the field of photogrammetry and remote sensing. The publication list of Uwe Stilla shows more than 400 entries.
Prof. Stilla is the Chair of the ISPRS Working Group II/III “Pattern Analysis in Remote Sensing”, is a Principal Investigator of the International Graduate School of Science and Engineering (IGSSE), a member of the Scientific Board of German Commission of Geodesy (DGK), Vice chairman of Commission for Geodesy and Glaciology (KEG) of the Bavarian Academy of Science and Humanities, Munich, Germany and President of the German Society of Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Geoinformation (DGPF).


Abstract
Building Information Modeling (BIM) is increasingly gaining the attention of researchers in architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) as well as in geo-information science (GIS). While Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing have established a strong link to GIS over decades, the field of mapping and reconstruction of spatial building structures in context of BIM is still young and challenging. The challenge becomes clear when comparing the modeling of buildings in GIS (e.g. CityGML) and BIM (e.g. IFC) which have different starting situations and objectives. Introducing digital methods for the build environment in civil engineering is required for reducing the backlog of digitization in industry and is forced by many countries. This presentation addresses the challenges and possibilities of Photogrammetry supporting the monitoring of existing buildings and buildings under construction using BIM. Three different ways for the acquisition of photogrammetric point clouds of construction sites and the method for automatic progress monitoring using a 4D-BIM are shown and discussed.



 

 

Positioning techniques and accuracy requirements in Geo-sciences and Engineering

Kostas E. Katsambalos
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Greece
 

Brief Bio

Kostas Katsampalos is Professor of Geodesy and Surveying and Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. He studied Surveying Engineering at the National Technical University of Athens (1975) and he received  ?.Sc. (1976) and Ph.D. in Geodetic Science (1981) at the Ohio State University, USA.  He was Research Associate at the same time. He was Assistant Professor (1985), Professor (1994) and Chairman of the School of Surveying Engineering (1995 and 2011). He is member of the scientific committee of the Technical Chamber of Greece, professional association of surveying engineers, National Cadastral and Mapping Organization, national correspondent in FIG, CLGCE, EuroGeographics and scientific coordinator for the Hellenic Positioning System (HEPOS) since 2007. He participated  in more than 20 research projects and international thematic networks. He is author of three textbooks, 70 research papers, five software packages for geodetic and cartographic transformations and multimedia applications. He teaches geodetic surveying, computer programming and GPS applications in undergraduate and graduate level.


Abstract
Twenty three centuries ago, Eratosthenes estimated the circumference of the earth, with an error of less than 10%, measuring a surface distance based on  camel traveling time. At the end of the 19th century, astronomers were measuring φ and λ  with an accuracy of 1 arcsec which is equivalent to 30 meters. Current day Global Navigational Satellite Systems (GNSS) like GPS, Galileo, GLONASS, have reached accuracies better than 1mm in 3D, including the height above the mean sea level. Repeated positioning estimations reveal the 3D displacements, due to complex tectonic motions. Therefore, from the era of determining φ,λ at epoch t, we have reached today a 13-component group which should be assigned to any point: X,Y,Z,σX,σY,σΖ,vX,vY,vZ,σvX,σvY,σvZ, at a selected epoch t. Many international or regional agencies (like EUREF/EPN) and a number of national mapping and cadastral agencies (civil, military, public or private) operate CORS (continuously operated reference stations), like the Hellenic HEPOS providing high accuracy positional services to the general public. In areas of significant tectonic motion, these networks offer valuable geodata to all sciences, under a unique scientific umbrella since the end of 2017.  GIS, cartography, cadastral, navigation, construction engineering, as-built databases, transportation, internet of things, and most interdisciplinary applications, have a lot to benefit from cheap and accurate satellite positioning.



 

 

Keynote Lecture

Eugene Fiume
University of Toronto
Canada
 

Brief Bio

Eugene Fiume is Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Applied Sciences at Simon Fraser University, Canada. He is the former Chair of Department of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. Following his B.Math. degree from the University of Waterloo and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Toronto, he was an NSERC Postdoctoral Fellow and Maitre Assistant at the University of Geneva, Switzerland. He was awarded an NSERC University Research Fellowship in 1987 and returned to the University of Toronto to a faculty position. He has written two books and (co-)authored over 130 papers on these topics. He has won several awards: two teaching awards; Innovation Awards from ITRC for research in computer graphics, and Burroughs-Wellcome for biomedical research; an NSERC Synergy Award for innovation and industrial collaboration in visual modelling; and the 2014 CHCCS Achievement Award. He was elected Eurographics Fellow in July 2014, and became a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in September 2014. He was papers chair for SIGGRAPH 2001, past chair of the SIGGRAPH Awards Committee (2003-2008) and the ACM Paris Kanellakis Awards Committee (2011), general co-chair of Symposium for Computer Animation 2008, Pacific Graphics International 2011, and the Eurographics Symposium on Rendering 2016.


Abstract
Available Soon



footer